How Will I use my Storage Appliance?

Servers and Applications attached to storage appliance
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We previously discussed doing a storage study for your environment.  This article continues after you’ve done that study and have those numbers to help you in determining what you need in a storage appliance.  In this article we will go into the use scenario for your environment.  In essence, “How will you use this storage appliance?”  What applications will be attached and how many users will be on these applications?  How will that affect what I need in a storage appliance?  This article is designed as a starting point for the novice user, not the storage expert.  It will make you ask the right questions for your environment so that you can find the right answers to get the best solutions for your needs.

So, to determine how we will use this appliance, we need to take stock of our environment.  Don’t worry, this is not as in depth as the storage study.  As a matter of fact, you probably already know most of this information just from administering your environment.  It is just a matter of collecting all of this information in one place and using it to project how you are currently using your environment, and how you plan to use a storage appliance in the future.

Numbers of servers, applications, and users.

Probably the single most important consideration of the storage environment is how many.  This applies to how many servers, applications, and users will be regularly using this storage.  Of course, a storage appliance that regularly supplies data to hundreds of users will have different speed and space requirements than appliances that may be used by only a few users.  The Google and Facebook storage environments will amaze you.  So to start, we need a pretty good estimate of how many physical and/or virtual servers may be attaching to this storage and how many users will be accessing data on it as well.

It stands to reason that a mail server that is supporting a large company will need more storage resources than a server that is supporting a dozen.  More users means more space and more speed.  This should spill over into every aspect of your environment.  The larger applications with more users will need more speed and probably more space.

If all of your applications are inward facing, then your work on this part is almost done.  Many companies, however, also host data or applications for outside users as part of their business model.  Maybe it is as simple as an ordering system that a few trusted customers are allowed access to, or it might be as complicated as you company hosting data as your business model.  Either way, it is important to count outside customers in the numbers that you will use to determine storage requirements.  And those customers may be the most important of any that you have.

Future Growth

Also important, although it is not our primary concern, is future growth.  This includes anything that will grow the amount of storage, like acquisitions.  The current space and number of users will tell us where our storage appliance needs to be NOW.  Several items in the storage study will show us how large we are growing with current users and applications.  Future growth of employees and business units will give us a look into how much larger we may need to grow outside of our regular growth numbers.  Because almost nothing gets smaller, right?

What applications are you using?

The type of application that you plan to run in conjunction with your storage appliance matters, and there are two primary types of access.  The speed of access is important to applications like databases.  The amount of storage is important to applications like file shares and home directories.  Please note that these two types of applications are NOT mutually exclusive.  Traditional applications will use a combination of both.  A pure inventory database is probably running very lean and wants speed.  Especially if it is serving records out to multiple sites or users.  I have never met a DBA that doesn’t want more speed and then even more.  But that database may reference a document imaging system that contains large files.  Or it may have BLOBs inside of it.  These things will increase the amount of space needed, but also require that objects be accessible in a reasonable amount of time.

Do a site survey of the applications and their types in your environment.  It is important to keep in mind that databases are everywhere.  In the traditional applications, but also in your mail application.  In special applications that may be specific in your business.  And CERTAINLY in most business intelligence applications that management may be using.

Is or will virtualization be in this environment?

You may be using virtualization in your environment and are looking to add shared storage.  Or you may be looking to virtualize and want to “do it right” by adding a storage appliance right off the bat.  Neither way is wrong and both can apply to this decision.  A well done storage study includes either the servers that are already virtualized or the servers that you will virtualize.

As a small aside, remember that Aristotle said “Nature abhors a vacuum”.  This is how it applies to you. Only the physically unique servers will not be virtualized once you see how great virtualization is.  I refer to servers with physical hardware that cannot be virtualized.  Like a fax server with special cards, or a huge database server that is clustered for performance or availability.

I mentioned storage space above, and that is an important consideration.  Virtualization makes your physical environment much more efficient.  With additional storage space, there is always the temptation to build more.  More servers, more drives, more home directories with cute downloaded pictures of kittens and recipes.  This is not an “if” question, it will happen.  Since you are virtualized, every manager’s wish list of applications comes true.


In addition to virtualization of servers, there is always the virtualization of desktops, laptops, and portals. The end users in your business.  VDI is an extension of server virtualization technologies and is making serious inroads into businesses large and small. The advantages make it easy to see why.  While planning actual storage requirements for VDI is outside the scope of this document, it is a consideration.  If you are planning to add VDI into your environment, then now is the time to start planning.  You will need a fair amount of capacity and speed depending on the number of users you plan to support.

If you are not planning to add it right now, then at least consider the ramifications that it could have to your storage environment.  New storage appliances are usually a significant purchase.  Plan on how to expand space and speed capacity on the unit you wish.


In a previous article, we discussed things that you should look for before deciding on a storage appliance that is applicable for your environment.  In this article, we went over the second of the information gathering exercises – How you intend to use your appliance.  What your current environment entails as far as users and applications, how those applications access data, and the presence of virtualization or VDI in your environment are all important questions to answer.  In the next article, we will look at how best to connect your storage appliance to your existing network.  Do we use existing infrastructure, or will we be adding the newest and fastest tech out there?  Tune in next week!

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