The Case for data protection – Tuesday’s ransomware attack

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The second reported attack of NSA-esque ransomeware this Tuesday should not surprise any systems administrators or IT staff. These attacks are happening on an increasing basis, and with the release of the “Vault 7” documents as a how-to-for-hackers, they will only increase. Google hacker culture, Vault 7 or script-kiddies. Suffice it to say, that dangers like this are a growing concern that needs to be addressed in your Data Protection plan.

Data Protection Plans

Getting back to the basics of Data Protection, todays’ article will discuss how backups as a part of your DP program, can help with ransomeware attacks. Backups may bring up visions of hurricanes or tornadoes, but it goes well beyond that. Data protection also means, well, protecting your data. From all the threats out there, including accidentally deleted files and not so accidentally deleted files, or even ransomed files.

So, you may be asking, how does data protection actually protect me from ransomeware? To put it simply, ransomeware doesn’t remove your data and your files, like a tornado, hard drive crash, or hurricane. It removes YOUR ACCESS to that data and files.  Time and mathematics instead of wind, rain, and lightening are denying access to your data. The files are still there, but you can’t use them to do what you need to do.


This is the case for backups. We previously discussed the several use cases for snapshots in an article, but in this instance, any backup will do as long as the backups were taken BEFORE the systems became infected with ransomeware.

To this point, you should have a backup SCHEDULE. That means that you don’t just keep the latest copy of your backup, your keep staggered copies of your backups. One of the most famous backup schemes is Grandfather-Father-Son backups. While the scope of your backup schedule is beyond this article, suffice it to say that you should have at least one month of good backups if you have to restore data. With many of the backup appliances on the market these days, this is taken care of for you. And with compression and deduplication technologies the amount of data that can be stored on-site or remotely is truly astounding.

This solution is not perfect, but better than paying someone to release the data that you generated in the first place. Or maybe not – maybe the hackers will sell you an enterprise license? Good Data Protection policies deal with many ways to keep your data YOUR data. This includes making sure you can access it.

In the grand scheme of things, this rash of WannaCry-type ransomeware attacks will continue. While security companies are rapidly working to cut down these attacks, if your data protection isn’t cutting the mustard these attacks will be terrible for your ability to support the other departments of your company. It is time to have a discussion with management about your data protection strategy and how these attacks affect it. Like they say “Life is tough, but it’s tougher if you are stupid.”

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