Is Backup Software Dead?

Is Backup Software Dead?
Image courtesy of Simon Howden at

Is backup software dead?  Everywhere I look, I see increased functionality within storage appliances and operating systems.  Appliances will backup themselves, Operating Systems now have quiescing and basic back up support, and the cloud is making backup targets stupid easy.  Should I buy dedicated backup software, or does my hardware, hypervisor or Operating System handle this?

As a storage professional, I will never discourage anyone from taking backups. As a matter of fact, I personally believe that more is better.  I am sure that many of have heard the popular saying ‘Two is one and one is none.’  Anyone who has mounted a blank backup that “worked last time” understands the wisdom of multiple backups.  Balancing this wisdom against the cost of additional methods of backup – what should I do?  While there is no one answer that will work for everyone, discussions help us formulate plans.

Many hardware solutions provide backup

I’m a big fan of taking administrative tasks off-line.  As an axiom to that, the closer I can get backup to where the data lives, the faster the backup will occur and the SMALLER the impact to production systems.  It stands to reason – if a system snapshot takes place on the storage appliance and it takes milliseconds to execute, isn’t that better than a full backup through system agents that may take hours over the weekend?

To take advantage of this, many storage vendors have added support within their hardware for snapshots and replication.  In essence, this makes a copy of your data volume and moves it within your environment.  Yes, this usually only works on products within the same manufacturing family.  Yes, vendors must support quiescing.  But many OS vendors are now building the functionality within their operating system to quiesce resident data painlessly.  Well, painlessly once you get it set up.  But what was once the realm of large, intense database houses, or financial trading houses now ships with many OSes.

This seems easy enough, right?  Your storage appliance and OS will do most of the difficult work.  But what about support for your hypervisor?  Maybe those legacy apps don’t support some sort of OS quiescing?  Or what about those that don’t even have a dedicated storage appliance?

Backup Software

While it will never be as fast as dedicated storage appliance backup, backup software does have a place.  Many places in fact.

Backup Software’s arguably most important function is as a broker.  The software acts as the middleman between your data (the source) and where ever you would like a copy of the data (the target).  And it provides a greater amount of flexibility than traditional “baked-in” solutions from hardware manufacturers.  Of course, this is a simplistic approach, and many backup packages have lots of gizmos and what-nots to make a backup administrator’s life easier.  But the main function is moving data.

Software works well with dissimilar hardware.  Want to backup data across many different manufacturers?  Software can do it. Want to move it between disk, tape, and the cloud?  Removable media?  Software shines here.  Want to work with legacy applications or operating systems that may not support data integrity?  Software does this and gives you the flexibility to customize it to your environment.

What works for you

I see a place for both hardware and software in a backup strategy.  Of course, I’m also the guy that still sees tape as the most economical means to store and archive large amounts of data.  The key point is to do what works for you.  I’ve worked with large organizations that had more data than could be reasonably backed up through software.  In this case, snaps and replication were a great fit.  But those same organizations had legacy apps that needed databases backed up hot and live, then log files backed up as well to insure transactional integrity.  Software to the rescue.

My point is that there are many tools in your toolbelt to use.  But, technology always changes. Does your hardware provide all the things you need to recover your data in an emergency? With the amazing growth of data, do you see software still being a viable backup method into the future?  How do budgets and cost affect your decision?  Please share your thoughts!


Share this: