Tag: SMB

The case for HCI – a user survey review

Computer survey
Image courtesy of Master isolated images at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

I recently had the opportunity to review some information collected by TechValidate on an HCI vendor, Scale Computing. Now, for full disclosure, AR Consultant Group is a partner of Scale Computing.  Scale Computing makes an HCI product marketed under the product family of HC3.  Even so, data collected by TechValidate is pertinent to HCI solutions across the board.  After reviewing the data and how it was presented, I found it not only easy to research, but a great way to show potential customers and even those mildly curious the advantages of HCI.

Many are not familiar with HCI, or HyperConverged Infrastructure.  It is the combination of compute resources, storage, and hypervisor without the licensing costs in a single preconfigured package.  Certainly, there are other things that vendors add in order to differentiate themselves, but these three are standard within the hyperconverged solution set.  In this particular instance, Scale Computing targets the SMB community, those businesses with between 100 to 500 employees and 1 to 5 IT staff.

The Data

First and foremost, the data bowled me over.  Not the actual data itself, but the method with which the data is presented.  If you haven’t seen the TechValidate package, then you certainly should.  It is a great way to present data and customer opinions.  TechValidate surveyed customers after purchase on what product advantages they found and other traditional data points.  They then presented this data using real-life Scale customers.  The company profiles also back the data up.  Seems like an innovative way to proactively publish data that allows customers and prospective clients to investigate specific data points that interest them – from people that are actually using the product.

The Results

The graphs provided by TechValidate center around challenges that are solved by the Scale HC3 solution.  Also charted are what benefits the customer perceives from a hyperconverged solution.  First, let’s examine the Operational Challenges data.

Operational Challenges Solved by HCI

Operational Challenges solved by hyperconvered technologies from Scale fell primarily into two categories – improvement of processes and reduction of cost or complexity.

The improvement of process challenges appear to revolve around the benefits of virtualization in a preconfigured clustered setup.  By handling the hardware and software clustering aspects of virtualization through hyperconversion, these solutions allow for hassle-free increases in customer processes.   Server hardware clustering and failover, failover of other infrastructure aspects, and simplification of disaster recovery became much simplier.  In other words, the manufacturer made these benefits easy to implement for customer business.

Customer Content verified by TechValidate.


Reducing cost and complexity of hyperconverged solutions, allows customers to enjoy reduced cost of purchasing everything separately.  This also reduces time spent in administration of all the systems separately,  It reduces complexity of support through having a single vendor support contract.

By making the IT function more efficient and getting more value for the budget, this survey addresses many of the main concerns of staff and management of the SMB.

Biggest Benefit from Scale Computing HCI

A follow-up survey asked customers of Scale Computing about the actual business benefits they found from implementing HC3.  Again, these fell into two basic categories – Ease of use and improvement to the information technology environment.

Customer References verified by TechValidate.


Ease of use is the largest benefit by a large margin.  Making the product easy to use increases the interest from customers. “Hey, this will work for me“.  It also shows a benefit to the customer.  Now that it is “easier” to do tasks it therefore cuts down on my after-hours/weekend work.  In addition, it gives me the time to pursue other projects.  It is also easier to train new staff on how to support the system. Believe me, coming from a guy who carried a weekend pager and supported physical servers, these are huge benefits.

Improvement of environment encompasses many different benefits that customers found.  Benefits included improved reliability, scalability, and high availability of business critical workloads.  While these benefits are available to any company, the ability of a single product to bring all these benefits together is a game changer.  It is now possible to get these benefits from a single package that works in your environment.  With a minimum of stress.  It is also expandable and less expensive than doing it a la carte.

The Feedback

It is refreshing to see actual verifiable customer feedback from a third party, not marketing slicks.  Data that extols the value of both HCI, and Scale Computing’s implementation of HCI .  This customer feedback is available in a condensed form.  There is also the ability to dive deeper into the data. So potential customers can research their industry, geographical location, and company size.  These are real world data points from customers, not a marketing department.

 

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Where did the 15K disk drive go?

15k disk
Image courtesy of Suriya Kankliang at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Just a few years ago, everyone wanted disk drives that spun at 15,000 rpm, commonly known as “15k disk”.  Why did people want these?  Well, the faster the spindle turned, the shorter the seek times, the less latency and the faster the writes to that disk.  Since I never worked at any of the drive manufacturers, I can’t really speak to the truth of this, but I do take it on faith.  So when everything on a storage array was spinning disk, why did people want “15k spindles” in the line up?  And since SSD has become so popular, why don’t I really see them anymore?

Why do I want expensive, small disks?

The reason that everyone wanted 15k disk drives was pretty straightforward.  The disk themselves were fairly small in capacity (600GB being a standard size) and expensive on a GB/$ ratio.  But they were FAST.  If there was a target IOPs for a storage array, it was easier to balance out size and speed with a ratio of 15k disk, 10k disk, and standard 7.2k SATA drives.  Speed from the smaller drives and space from the slower drives.  While everything was acceptable ON AVERAGE, the laws of physics still applied to the different speeds of disk. There was a bit of balance that had to happen. You could put your fast access volumes on 15k, but you still needed the SATA drives for the larger storage requirements.  This solution worked, but was expensive – and a bit “hands-on”.

There were even a few manufacturers that started to offer ILM with these systems.  This means that “hot” or active data writes to the 15k disk drives since theoretically the write speed on these is fastest.  Your storage appliance now writes more across the aggregate of your SAN environment.  Once this data is written to the fastest disk on your SAN or NAS, it stays there for a bit.  This logic being that it also has the fastest read times and therefore the best performance when you wanted to recall that data.  These ILM vendors then move the data off of the fastest tier of disk to a slower tier as that data becomes less active or “ages”.  This allowed you to store older, less accessed data on the slower and less expensive tiers of storage.  Because the database has to run quickly, but who cares if it takes accounting a week to get the data for their year-end reporting, right?  Remember that the next time you need that expense report reimbursed!

The next step

Then SSD entered the market.  At an affordable price, that is.  Not only could manufacturers use SSD as caching, but they were large enough that manufacturers could also use them as the fastest tier of data storage in an ILM strategy.  And the form factor of SSD disks allows them to be used in the existing storage appliance enclosures – JUST LIKE spinning disk.  Now, instead of expensive 15k disks, you could put in units in the same form factor that would read and write several hundred times faster than disk.  With the speed and storage capability of SSD, it became unnecessary to use 15K disk in storage appliances for speed.

But I still see some 15k disk out there…

You will still see 15k disk used in local solutions.  A 15K SAS disk RAID 5 array is quite speedy when used in a local physical server.  Virtualization solutions, or database servers will often use 15K spindles for disk targets.  They need sizable storage capacities and quick access.  However, the cost of SSD is coming down.  This allows the justification for installation of SSD disk or arrays in physical servers.  Seagate has stopped development of new models for their 15k disk.  Previously storage technology leapt from Tape to HDD for large data storage like disaster recovery.  Now storage acceptance from high speed disk to SSD will likely accelerate.  Technology to increase access speed, reduce manufacturer costs, and increase storage capacity will accelerate this change.  So long 15k disk, we hardly knew ya!

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The SMB IT Guy’s guide to ensuring your success from Hyperconvergence.

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

By now, everyone realizes the advantages of server virtualization. Flexibility in the face of rapidly changing technology, reduction in administrative effort on busy IT staff, and cost savings from reducing physical machines is just the beginning. As you may have heard, hyperconverged infrastructure solutions offer all of these advantages, plus the added benefit of simplicity in your environment.

This article is targeted towards small to mid-sized business: 50 to 500 employees supported with 1-5 or so staffers in the IT department. These IT shops don’t rely on specialists, but a few really good “jack-of-all-trades”.  If you are looking for a way to bring this up with the boss, make sure to see the article written for the senior directors or owners in the business here.

So – there are a lot of different hyperconverged vendors out there and a lot of solutions. If you believe the literature and web demos, they will all do everything you need in your environment. How do you know which is the best and what to look out for?

As with everything in life, the answer is – It depends. No one can answer the question of which is best for you, without the intimate knowledge of your environment which probably only you have. What I can do is provide you with some questions that you might want to ask the various solutions providers. These may help you determine which solution works best for your organization, and that management will buy off on.

Here are 5 questions to help you in your inquiry.

What comes in the box?

Well, not literally, but what does this solution entail? How many servers of MINE will this solution cover, and how much extra capacity will I have? Are there any extras that might later cost me money or maintenance fees? Are installation services needed and possibly included in this solution? Is high availability between hardware units included in this quote? The answers to these questions may not make or break the solution for you, but you should know what you are getting for your money. You need to be able to present this effectively to management so no one gets any unpleasant surprises later. Maybe you only need a barebones system right now. That’s fine, but make sure that you know what is included and what everyone’s expectations are.

Licenses

There are a few main solutions out there and they all handle this differently. Many manufacturers of these solutions OEM hypervisors, so ask how that affects the cost of your unit(s). Is there the possibility of having to purchase additional software licenses in order to expand? Are all of the management consoles and utilities provided under the license of the hyperconverged product? If not, what isn’t included that I may want, and where can I get it? Do I need to deal with the hyperconverged manufacturer, or do I have to drag another vendor into this? How many vendors are involved in this solution and who do I call if I need support? Are there different tiers in the number of licenses? What do my maintenance costs look like 3 and 5 years out? If my server count grows by 20% per year, what additional costs will I encounter? Most solutions providers will be more than happy to work these numbers for you, and your management will love your forward thinking “strategic planning”.

Simplicity and Ease of Use

Hyperconverged infrastructure solutions are all about making things simple, right? Find out. Get to know how this particular solution works. You don’t need to see the actual code, but it might be nice to know conceptually how everything fits together. Does this solution come with any training? Is training required? Is training an extra cost? Are basic functions like setting up virtual machines, virtual disks, and virtual NICs intuitive? What about more advanced tasks? That pesky application that we have that demands VLAN tagging, how does this solution support that? Can I do every task I need to do from the management interface? How easy is this product to use for non-pre-sales-engineers-that-don’t-work-for-the-manufacturer?

Backup, Recovery, and Failover

OK – we are looking at this solution because recovery and business continuity are supposedly made much easier with this. Can I stop dropping by the office after hours and on weekends to do silly little server tasks, like rebooting crashed boxes… for payroll… at the end of the month? How does this solution help me with recovery tasks? How does it handle a crashed server? How does the solution handle network failures, disk failures, or whole server failures? Can I SEE it demonstrated live? How will this solution affect my existing backup strategy? Will my current backup solution work, or does this solution include something that replaces it? Does it do native snapshots? How many? Will it replicate those snapshots somewhere automagically? How can my existing DR plan be improved with this solution?

Scalability

Everyone has a constantly changing environment. How does this solution handle growth and changing needs? What does it take to add 20% capacity to this solution? How much does it cost, and how easy is it to do? Will I have to stop production or do it at 3am? Do I need additional chassis to do this, or can I upgrade the units internally? Will this require downtime? What if I want to start moving things to the edge of my infrastructure? How flexible is this product? Do I have the ability to add more memory, CPU, or plain disk to this solution independent of purchasing the next model? What is the roadmap for this product line – Flash disk, software, and NIC speeds?

Hyperconverged infrastructure promises to be an amazing step in the IT virtualization lifecycle. There are different capabilities and features in all of the various solutions. You just need to ask a few questions to figure out which one is right for you. Not just right for you right now, but right for you in 3 to 5 years. Only after you can answer the questions above will you be able to enjoy the REAL benefits of simplicity that hyperconvergence provides.

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The SMB Owner’s Guide to Ensuring Your Success with Hyperconvergence.

SMB manager owner CIO executive
Image courtesy of imagerymajestic at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Hyperconvergence is the newest IT architecture that is removing both cost and complexity from virtualization infrastructure. This article assumes you are aware of the advantages of hyperconvergence and how it applies to the business end of your small to medium business. What we are going to discuss is how to ensure that you are getting the TRUE advantages from Hyperconvergence over what all those fancy marketing papers say you can.

A small to medium business(SMB) doesn’t mean just a tiny kiosk in the mall that only has a single POS computer. We’re talking about SMB in terms of between 50 to 500 employees with an IT staff of up to 5 full or part-time staffers.

There are a lot of claims out there around hyperconvergence technologies. At the top of the list is reducing costs. Also, it claims to be a simpler environment for your IT staff – increasing productivity. As the business owner, what questions do you need to ask to ensure that your hard-earned capital is well spent?

Among all the claims, there are 5 things that you need to look for in a hyperconverged solution to ensure that your solution brings everything to your business that it can.

Vendors in the solution

One of the claims of hyperconvergence is simplification of the solution. This is potentially achieved by eliminating the multitude of vendors that are part of a traditional virtualized solution. This solution involves how many vendors? Where do the individual responsibilities of each vendor start and stop? Will you need multiple support contracts, or is everything covered under one master contract? Is there a central support number to call, or is there the possibility of finger-pointing between various manufacturers? In this vein, is the solution the intellectual property of one company, or are there different licensing agreements in place? How could this affect YOUR investment in the event of a manufacturer bankruptcy?

Licensing

The initial install of the solution is probably correctly sized for your business. What happens if you need to expand that installation? If you need more virtual servers, or to add more users, are there going to be any additional license fees (Vmware)? What about yearly maintenance fees, will those grow, too? What if we expand and I want to add virtual servers at another location? Are my licenses “tiered” or do they get more expensive for additional functionality or when I hit a certain license count? These are not necessarily deal-breakers, but fore-warned is fore-armed. It sure helps to have a reliable idea of licensing costs when budget time rolls around.

Expandability

Hyperconverged solutions come in all shapes and sizes. Different solutions exist for a dozen virtualized servers, and for several hundred virtual servers. Whichever you have is not as important as the answer to the question Is the solution expandable? Does the solution have the ability to cover your business as it grows, without the dreaded “fork-lift upgrade”, which means downtime for the profit-centers of your business. In addition to this, if upgrades are possible, do they involve downtime?  Can your sales department sell while the upgrades occur?

Installation

Sure, everyone will be more than happy to install this beast once you have signed on the dotted line, but just how complex is that installation? Can we operate on the existing systems and minimize downtime while the installation occurs? How complex is the switchover to the new systems (Easily migrating VMs or data)? Can your IT staff shadow the installation? Is it easy enough that they can do it themselves with just a bit of guidance?  Can your staff expand the system, or will you need outside help?

Ease of Use

Now that we have it and everything is running, just how difficult is it to get my IT staff up to speed on the product? Is there additional training that will take my staff off site in order to learn how to use this product? Once I train my staff, am I in danger of losing them to a competitor willing to pay more for those certifications? When we add additional virtual servers to the environment, will my staff be able to do that? How difficult is it, and how long will it take? Since my staff isn’t as large as some of the big-guys, how difficult is it to cross-train?

Summary

Hyperconvergence is an amazing leap forward for IT virtualization. Correctly sized, designed, and implemented it promises a lot to the small to medium business. But like most things in life, one size doesn’t necessarily fit all. Spending money wisely requires due diligence. Make sure the business squeezes all of the value that you paid for from this solution. Address the questions around vendors, licensing, systems expandability, installation and ease of use.

Engage with the manufacturers and ask the solutions provider the next step questions addressed in this article. This will ensure that you enjoy the advantages advertised while getting the exact solution to benefit your business NOW.

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How Do I connect to my Storage Appliance?

Fiber Channel attached Storage Appliance
Image courtesy of cookie__cutter at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

In this article, we are examining the third question asked in our original article The Beginners Guide to what to know before you shop for a Storage Appliance.  That question in a nutshell is “How do I intend to connect my storage so that all of my applications can get to it?”  Well, that question begs a good look at your current environment.  Based on what you find, we will determine if you should connect to your existing environment or connect through other dedicated technologies within your existing environment.  There are also other less common methods to connect to your storage.

Using Existing network infrastructure

Is your network stable?  Every network administrator or sysadmin knows who the problem children are in their network.  Do you have any segments or switches in your environment that are currently congested or causing delays now?  Adding storage to it will only exacerbate the problem.  On the flip side of that coin, a well-running network makes adding storage easy and inexpensive.

In addition, the speed of your existing network will come into play.  Depending on your current storage needs, I would recommend that no one attach storage at speeds of less than 1 Gigabit Ethernet. As 10 GigE becomes more affordable and more pervasive in networks, it is never a bad idea to increase bandwidth to your storage.  Fortunately, many manufacturers enable upgrading with field replaceable units.  Speak with the vendor about this ability in the units you are investigating.

Most storage appliances will support a variety of connection protocols.  For storage area networks (SAN), it is important that iSCSI be supported in the unit.  iSCSI will support most of the externally mounted volumes or LUNs (Logical Unit Number).  For Network Attached Storage (NAS), NFS is a popular way of attaching storage for most virtualization shared storage and *nix computing.  These storage protocols may all be supported, or only some of them.  SMB/CIFS should be supported for full functionality in a Microsoft network.

Using Dedicated connection technologies

There are situations where the use of the existing network may not be advisable.  If the network is older or slow, putting the data needs of shared storage on the network will just exacerbate an already slow situation.  In this case, there are dedicated connection technologies that may come to the rescue.

Ethernet connectivity is still a very viable alternative, using dedicated switches and VLANs.  VLANs are Virtual Local Area Networks that allow for the logical partitioning of ports within a switch to create virtual switches and LANs.  This lets you segregate data traffic and dedicate resources to the various ports that may be passing your data traffic.

Fiber Channel (FC) is a mature, well established connection technology.  FC uses glass fibers to connect physical servers to physical storage using light.  While this technology is a bit more expensive than traditional ethernet switches it does have advantages over ethernet.  There is tremendous support for this protocol in software and hardware because it is a very stable protocol developed specifically for storage.  Fiber Channel allows for data to be consistently delivered with very low overhead.  Fiber Channel switches are available to connect servers to storage in a logical mesh setup, but it is also a regular practice to directly connect servers with FC Host Bus Adapters (HBA’s – think of an HBA as a fiber channel version of a network card).  This will cut out the expense of a Fiber Channel switch for smaller deployments.

Exotic Connection methods

In addition to the well established protocols of Fiber Channel and iSCSI, there are other ways to connect storage.  There are storage appliances out there that will allow connection to servers via specialized technologies like InfiniBand, or SAS ports.  There is eSATA that is available.  These various ways to connect range from the super fast (InfiniBand – and expensive by the way) to the fairly common and slow.  “Exotic” connection technologies serve special cases and are outside the scope of this article.  These connection technologies will limit your field of vendors, but not disqualify you from a storage appliance.

Considerations of Connectivity

In addition to the connection methods discussed above, there are also other connectivity possibilities to consider.  Bonded connections is one.  Bonded connections make multiple physical paths (read cables or ports) to appear as one logical path to data.  In essence, two 1GB Ethernet connections becomes one logical 2 GB Ethernet connection.  A single path of bandwidth to the storage appliance will be quickly overwhelmed.  There will be many servers and users trying to connect to the storage.  Bonding allows several ports to simultaneously send out data.  Bonding also helps with failover.

Another consideration of connectivity is failover.  Although it may not happen often, if a cable, NIC, or port fails on the storage appliance or on the connectivity side, all servers using that storage are suddenly unable to access data.  Or all of your virtual machines may come down at once.  You have placed all of your proverbial eggs in that one proverbial basket.  Failover mitigates this risk accordingly.

This is often accomplished through the use of different controllers or “heads”.  Two (or more) controllers allows for multiple disparate paths to the data.  It allows for one head to crash and you still have access to your data.  It allows for one power supply to fail, and you still have access to your data.  Many manufacturers will vary on how they support this functionality, so it is important to research this carefully.  Make sure that the storage appliance will run on one power supply.  Verify that the controller heads support failover.  Implement bonded connections.

Summary

In this article, we have discussed the final question raised in our original article about finding the best storage appliance for your environment.  We have gone over considerations of attaching the shared storage to your existing network, the prospect of attaching the NAS or SAN via new connectivity, or even attaching via a special, non-standard or exotic connectivity mode.  Many vendors support these differing connectivity methods.  Specialized connectivity will limit the number of storage appliances that you have to choose from. Most users know that they are required from the start and can plan accordingly.

 

 

 

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How Will I use my Storage Appliance?

Servers and Applications attached to storage appliance
Image courtesy of cookie__cutter at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

We previously discussed doing a storage study for your environment.  This article continues after you’ve done that study and have those numbers to help you in determining what you need in a storage appliance.  In this article we will go into the use scenario for your environment.  In essence, “How will you use this storage appliance?”  What applications will be attached and how many users will be on these applications?  How will that affect what I need in a storage appliance?  This article is designed as a starting point for the novice user, not the storage expert.  It will make you ask the right questions for your environment so that you can find the right answers to get the best solutions for your needs.

So, to determine how we will use this appliance, we need to take stock of our environment.  Don’t worry, this is not as in depth as the storage study.  As a matter of fact, you probably already know most of this information just from administering your environment.  It is just a matter of collecting all of this information in one place and using it to project how you are currently using your environment, and how you plan to use a storage appliance in the future.

Numbers of servers, applications, and users.

Probably the single most important consideration of the storage environment is how many.  This applies to how many servers, applications, and users will be regularly using this storage.  Of course, a storage appliance that regularly supplies data to hundreds of users will have different speed and space requirements than appliances that may be used by only a few users.  The Google and Facebook storage environments will amaze you.  So to start, we need a pretty good estimate of how many physical and/or virtual servers may be attaching to this storage and how many users will be accessing data on it as well.

It stands to reason that a mail server that is supporting a large company will need more storage resources than a server that is supporting a dozen.  More users means more space and more speed.  This should spill over into every aspect of your environment.  The larger applications with more users will need more speed and probably more space.

If all of your applications are inward facing, then your work on this part is almost done.  Many companies, however, also host data or applications for outside users as part of their business model.  Maybe it is as simple as an ordering system that a few trusted customers are allowed access to, or it might be as complicated as you company hosting data as your business model.  Either way, it is important to count outside customers in the numbers that you will use to determine storage requirements.  And those customers may be the most important of any that you have.

Future Growth

Also important, although it is not our primary concern, is future growth.  This includes anything that will grow the amount of storage, like acquisitions.  The current space and number of users will tell us where our storage appliance needs to be NOW.  Several items in the storage study will show us how large we are growing with current users and applications.  Future growth of employees and business units will give us a look into how much larger we may need to grow outside of our regular growth numbers.  Because almost nothing gets smaller, right?

What applications are you using?

The type of application that you plan to run in conjunction with your storage appliance matters, and there are two primary types of access.  The speed of access is important to applications like databases.  The amount of storage is important to applications like file shares and home directories.  Please note that these two types of applications are NOT mutually exclusive.  Traditional applications will use a combination of both.  A pure inventory database is probably running very lean and wants speed.  Especially if it is serving records out to multiple sites or users.  I have never met a DBA that doesn’t want more speed and then even more.  But that database may reference a document imaging system that contains large files.  Or it may have BLOBs inside of it.  These things will increase the amount of space needed, but also require that objects be accessible in a reasonable amount of time.

Do a site survey of the applications and their types in your environment.  It is important to keep in mind that databases are everywhere.  In the traditional applications, but also in your mail application.  In special applications that may be specific in your business.  And CERTAINLY in most business intelligence applications that management may be using.

Is or will virtualization be in this environment?

You may be using virtualization in your environment and are looking to add shared storage.  Or you may be looking to virtualize and want to “do it right” by adding a storage appliance right off the bat.  Neither way is wrong and both can apply to this decision.  A well done storage study includes either the servers that are already virtualized or the servers that you will virtualize.

As a small aside, remember that Aristotle said “Nature abhors a vacuum”.  This is how it applies to you. Only the physically unique servers will not be virtualized once you see how great virtualization is.  I refer to servers with physical hardware that cannot be virtualized.  Like a fax server with special cards, or a huge database server that is clustered for performance or availability.

I mentioned storage space above, and that is an important consideration.  Virtualization makes your physical environment much more efficient.  With additional storage space, there is always the temptation to build more.  More servers, more drives, more home directories with cute downloaded pictures of kittens and recipes.  This is not an “if” question, it will happen.  Since you are virtualized, every manager’s wish list of applications comes true.

VDI

In addition to virtualization of servers, there is always the virtualization of desktops, laptops, and portals. The end users in your business.  VDI is an extension of server virtualization technologies and is making serious inroads into businesses large and small. The advantages make it easy to see why.  While planning actual storage requirements for VDI is outside the scope of this document, it is a consideration.  If you are planning to add VDI into your environment, then now is the time to start planning.  You will need a fair amount of capacity and speed depending on the number of users you plan to support.

If you are not planning to add it right now, then at least consider the ramifications that it could have to your storage environment.  New storage appliances are usually a significant purchase.  Plan on how to expand space and speed capacity on the unit you wish.

Summary

In a previous article, we discussed things that you should look for before deciding on a storage appliance that is applicable for your environment.  In this article, we went over the second of the information gathering exercises – How you intend to use your appliance.  What your current environment entails as far as users and applications, how those applications access data, and the presence of virtualization or VDI in your environment are all important questions to answer.  In the next article, we will look at how best to connect your storage appliance to your existing network.  Do we use existing infrastructure, or will we be adding the newest and fastest tech out there?  Tune in next week!

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The Beginners Guide to what to know before you shop for a Storage Appliance.

Checklist for storage appliance
Answer these questions to determine your best fit storage appliance.

This is a basic guide, meant for the jack-of-all-trades, not the storage professional. There is a dizzying array of storage appliances on the market.  Appliances with a list of features that would make a Swiss-Army knife blush. We could argue the pros and cons of specific features all day, but this article is more focused on the IT generalist.  More to the thinking, “Will this storage appliance help my business?” As such, we will discuss three initial questions to answer before starting the process of determining the best storage appliance for your environment.

These three questions are 1) How fast and how much storage do I need, 2) For what purpose do I need this storage, and 3) What technology will I use to attach this storage to my environment?

How much, how fast?

So – How much Storage Appliance do you need, and how fast does it need to be? In simple terms, it is time to do your homework. You can collect data on your network using a multitude of tools.  The common term for this work is a storage study or survey. In this study, you or an IT engineer will usually activate utilities that are already on your various systems.  These utilities collect information about how you use your storage on your various boxes over a period of time. As far as the sampling period goes, the longer the better with about 7 days being a happy medium.

Depending on how many systems you have at your location, the collation of this data can be a bit of a beast.  There are several vendors that have tools to help collate this data, and they are both free to download and worth the effort.  Here is a sample report of a personal favorite that supports individual systems as well as VMWare. Click Here to download a copy to run in your environment.

This collection of data will give you insight into how much data storage your environment uses, how often that data changes, and how fast your systems are trying to write data to that storage. This is fairly equivalent to horsepower and gas mileage in a car. There are several subtle nuances that will become important later in the decision process, but this collection will get you the information to start.  It is possible to put together a good picture of your environment, once you get this information.  Data show where you are and allows some assumptions as to how you may use data in the future. You will run into terms like Input/Output Operations a second (IOP/s), latency, and queued operations. Save the questions for later, we have more work to do.

How will I use my storage appliance?

How you intend to use this storage is an important factor in what storage is best for you. Is this storage for a single application like a database, or do you plan to share this storage across several servers and allow them to each use a portion of it? This may determine the sort of connectivity that you need. In addition to the number of applications that may be using this storage, what are those application doing? Databases tend to need more structured access to data and the faster the storage is, generally the better the database will perform. If you have several people on the database at the same time, this may become a factor. Also, for general storage, speed isn’t always the issue as much as perhaps usable space.

Is virtualization a factor in your storage decision? To achieve a truly virtualized environment, there must be shared storage between physically separate hardware servers. If you are virtualized, or plan to, this can be a factor in the type of storage that you choose. If you have considered VDI (virtual desktop infrastructure – or the “virtualization” of the desktops in your environment), then that will most definitely be a consideration in your decision.

How do I attach?

How do you plan to connect your storage to the hungry applications that need it? Unlike traditional direct attached storage, a SAN or NAS doesn’t just clip into your server using existing slots in the chassis. There is a bit of planning involved.

The most common ways to connect NAS and SAN devices is using your existing network. No problem if your network is serving your needs well.  If not – then there is some planning needed into how to best get your applications connected to the data that they crave. Fortunately, the numbers that we collected in the storage study will give you some insight into this. There are alternate ways to connect the storage, if your network isn’t cutting the mustard. Some are best for databases, some are designed to allow low-cost access and growth, and some are hugely expensive but fast as blazes – definitely used for specialized applications. Just collect your thoughts on this and we can use it in a further discussion.

Once you have this information collected, you are well on your way to the having the information that you need. Having done a storage study, determining how you intend to use your SAN, and determining how you will connect servers to the storage will start you in your journey to find the correct the SAN or NAS for you.

We will address each of these questions in more depth in future articles, so stay tuned.

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